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california where he had moved and eventually she goes to his home which they have a right to do and the man has these wonderful people the adopted three children who the parents were killed and one of them grew up on a pilot and this nurse goes into bob's room and comes to the wall and says why don't you have a dnr it means do not resuscitate. in effect asking him to die. bob's wife, his nurse, his doctor come all the people that saw the nurse do this and her other actions were just appalled by this. warren buffett didn't know of this. on the other hand what does he say about his company? so long as my managers make their numbers, i know the business they see fit and it's indicative of the callousness that is going on where we don't have balancing and we are so focused on profits you can have a company go and say please die. host could you talk in your book about these industries that have been deregulated and people think about regulation in terms of a democrat versus republican issue but or more of the problems created because of democrats or republicans or is this not a party related? >>
but in california that is in the tradition and there are others people can build on but if they can look and say okay in order to be really a valuable democratic process something needs to be inclusive and the lubber to it and it needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework for people to say here's how we can do it in our area. we don't have to have town halls we can have oranges and others in california so people can take that inspiration and use it wherever they are and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversations. >>> rosemary gibson reports on the creation of the patient protection and affordable care act and its recent passage and fiscal affect on the federal government. this is just over an hour. it's a pleasure to be here. thanks to you at st. peter's university hospital for the opportunity to be here today. the topic today's health care reform. it's based on the book and the principal author called the battle for health care obama as reform for america's future is a nonpartisan analysis of health care reform and we are headed. i appro
, california and eventually goes to his home, which they have a right to do and the meanings are these wonderful people who adopted three children were their parents were killed in marvelous human beans. the nurse goes into bob sura and points to the blonde says i'd share the tnr? dnr means do not resuscitate. party of medics keeping you alive when you have a medical emergency? is that asking him to die? is nurse, his doctor, all the people to solve the nurse to this under other actions were just appalled by this. well, warren buffett did know about this and wouldn't approve in the race. on the other hand, what does mr. buffett said so long as my managers the numbers as they see fit. it's indicative of the callousness going on, where we don't have that one or so focus on profit you could have a company go and say please die. >> host: but when we talked in your book about some of these industries being deregulated and certain the presidential campaign they talk about regulation in terms of democrats versus republican issues. but for more of these flaws, more of the problems cr
regulation. >> what impact, if any, do you think that the changes in california and their method for electing congressional representatives will have? >> are you referring to the redistricting? >> yes. democrat versus democrat, republican versus republican in their system of electing. >> if i am understanding your right, you are referring to -- now there was a kind of bipartisan commission that redesigned -- that did the redistricting. now, i actually did a story for the atlantic monthly on redistricting. i had mentioned this thing. there has been -- the belief by many politicians is that there is no such thing as a bipartisan board are nonpartisan board. they often times point to the california commission as a failed experiment because the democrats had menace to influence a series of e-mails obtained by pro public of which suggest that was the minister and floods a lot of these. having said that there are a number of other states in the u.s. that do have bipartisan redistricting commissions. and just for what it's worth another reason why this is a salient topic is that i am often asked, if
the past five years. in contrast in a speech in california in may, mitt romney said, quote, the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company it makes it harder for solar technology generally because the other entrepreneurs in the solar field suddenly lost their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar company when the government put half a billion dollars into one of its choice. excellent question. i wrote this book because we are not just spending half a billion dollars. we are spending $12 billion a year to make electricity more expensive rather than cheaper. that is $6 billion in tax breaks and $6 billion in direct expenditures. the green jobs that makes no sense and has low-income americans, we brainwash our children to think that green is good and fink uncritically about green products and green jobs and yet we can't even define what a green job is. let's start with a green jobs. the bureau of labor statistics has five definitions of the 3.1 million green jobs that it has counted. namely the energy from renewable sources, e
shading herself into bob manning's life in california where he moved, and eventually he goes to his home, which they have a investigate to do to inspect. and the mannings are these wonderful people who accommodated three children from a relative where the parents were killed, and marvelous human beings. one of the sons grew up to become an airline pilot. and the nurse goes into bob's room and points to the wall and says, why don't you have a dnr. that means do not resuscitate. why how having the medics try to keep you alive when you have an a medical emergency. in effect, asking him to die. and bob's wife, bob, his nurse, his doctor, all the people who saw the nurse do this and her other actions, were just appalled by this. well, you know, warren buffett didn't know about dismiss wouldn't approve of it. on the other hand, what does he say about his company? so long as my managers make their numbers, i let them run the businesses as they see fit. and it's indicative of the callousness going on where we don't have intestinal so focused on profits you can have a company go and say, please d
into bob manning slides in california where he moved, and eventually she goes to his home which they have a right to due to inspect. and the manning's are these wonderful people who, they adopted three children from the relative whose parents were killed, and marvelous human beings. this nurse goes into bob's room and points to the wall and system why don't you have a dnr? dnr means do not resuscitate. why are you having medics tried to keep you likely have one of your of emergencies which have us all the time, in effect asking him to die. bob's wife, bob, his nurse, his doctor, all the people who saw the nurse do this and/or other actions were just appalled by this. will, well, you know, warren buffett didn't know about this and wouldn't approve of italy's. but understand what does mr. buffett said about his company's? so long as my managers make their numbers, i let them run the bases that they see fit. and it's indicative of the callousness that is going on when we don't have balance and we are so focused on profit that we literally cannot a company go and say, please die. >> host: but
with. the presiding officer: without objection. the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i have listened to the senator from ohio, and i really want to be heard because he's talking about the fiscal cliff and how upset he is at the thought that the wealthiest people in america might go back to the tack rates we had under bill clinton when we had the greatest prosperity, we had 23 million new jobs, and we balanced the budget to the point where we even had a surplus. and my friend comes down here and he's complaining that the proposal on the table would give 98% of the people a tax cut, and he's upset that 2% of the people might have to go back to the rates under bill clinton. well, i just want to say something. we just had an election. we had a big election. we had a tough election. we had an expensive election. and one of the major parts of that election revolved around what do we do about the deficits, what do we do about economic growth, what do we do about spending, and we discussed it in the senate races, we discussed it in the house races, and of course president ob
-span. next is felix from california. caller: good morning. i mean democratic voter. -- i am an independent voter. what i heard from joe biden today is the fact that the problem we have always had is that the problems were caused by a republican. mitt romney -- host: thanks for the call. good afternoon caroline. caller: i am proud to be what i am. host: go ahead with your thoughts on this election. caller: my thought right now is joe biden >> tomorrow night watch election results from the presidential race as well as house, senate and governors contest across the country. we'll have coverage of president obama in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeche speeches,. >> we are engaged in the process and been working first in with fema, to make an overall assessment, that 25, up to 25% of those cell towers were disabled during this process. what the fcc does and will continue to do is to work with these entities, to assess the situation on the ground and to more so use this information to see where we can do adequate for. >> commissioner mignon clyburn on issues fac
election on either side. >> i will turner to the audience starting with dan glickman but california we have had a big shake up there in a new redistricting -- what are you watching in california? >> air seats that are in levels of contention. summer non-republican and democrat on democrat spending huge sums of money. as republican campaign chairman, california is always the toughest state force in a presidential race and eyes in eyes has been going into the presidency year, the turnout could hurt us. once you get and lend inland a little bit, california a little bit different at this point but that is something. it comes late and we want to make sure in we don't get her clock cleaned. i always get nervous about california. >> i advise pointed out to my friends at my home state of texas does not believe in referendum, recall or that good government stuff and i think we don't have term limits. i think that the fact that we have this crazy long california which was the result of the referendum i think is unfortunate and not good for the political process. >> the primary or the redistricting co
.c. for a while, moved to california. i was married for a while in california and then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again, and now i'm about to get married again. [laughter] so, thank you. hopefully it's the same guy. don't forget that. [laughter] >> you don't get gifts every time he there. that's problem. so i did have this very, i certainly had a personal stake in that so i was very pleasantly surprised him outside and i do think also, i want to look at this deeper but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the power of voting and the actual voting wasn't as big as it was in the past which just the extent that people were saying different things, if that ever was true, it feels like in this race are polling suggested that was kind of the margin and we won by the margins that were fairly close to the polling and i think if that's true that's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thinking. i think there was a tendency to feel that we had to really get very high numbers and so that was good news. >> that was let -- i was less confident about the racin
wasn't married, i lived in live in washington dc, i moved to california. i was married for a wild in california. then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. now, i am about to be married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully this same guy? [laughter] >> yes, we can't forget that. >> yes, you don't get gifts every time either. that's a problem. [laughter] so i did have this very -- i certainly had a personal stake in that. so i was very proud and 10 pleasantly surprised on that front. i also want to look at this deeper. but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the voting was not as big as it had been in the past. suggesting that people were saying different things. it feels like in this race, the polling suggested that that was kind of the margin and we won by a margin and we were fairly close to the polling. i think if that is true, it's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to feel that we really had to get very high numbers. so that was good news in my world. >> the staff said one thing,
aren't we getting together? >> that is a great idea. >> if you change california i could tell you sacramento is broke and. please but against every single tax. [applause] >> this crowd does not need to be reminded. >> the ballot is very long. vote against every single one. it's like giving her a went to a junkie. >> herald-tribune is for sale. how do we by media? >> bella also like to comment on the public-school said. liberals don't favor that but they send their kids to the white private school it does not matter to them but who is by teeing the vouchers to the and mail and al gore was asked in the debate in harlem and he was running for president as he was beholden to the teachers' unions a black reporter said if you are so big on the public schools then why do your kids go to private schools? he got angry and said don't bring my children and to this. way to. [laughter] hold on. not so fast. is great to start another fox news but why is that the only game in town? they have 10 times the ratings of cnn but it has not occurred two msnbc they are getting higher ratings of wonder i
their campuses safer. states from california to florida have introduced legislation to make it clear that child abuse reporting is not only a moral duty, but it's the law. this is tremendous progress. laws strengthens, policies tightened, governance revisited, and institutions made safer, and our work continues. that brings us to today, on the brink of the one year anniversary, civil lawsuits, perjury trials, and we can expect more fallout to come. over the last year, we have learned much about ourselves, our many cultures, our values, and our vision. we're still working through some difficult issues, but the question remains where do we go from here? the answer can be found by returning to penn state's core mission -- teaching, research, and service. our bottom line is delivering an outstanding education to students. our students are our top priority. i repeat, our students are our top priority, and they are doing great things. for example, this year, our journalism students captured the national championship in the william randolff hurst journalism award. engineering students took top honors
of california in 1962. nixon remembered that. [laughter] so one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing secretary was a fellow named george romney. who's son mitt has been in the news lately. mitt's day complained that ray was not being very cooperative. he seemed to think he could run it any way saw he fit. there was talk that ray may have used fannie mae postage or letter head to raise money for the democratic candidates. and the white house was gets complaints from the republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all fannie mae work related to foreclosures. all the fees. within nine months nixon fired him as fannie mae without giving any public explanation. he resisted. he full min nate to the press that nixon was turning fannie mae in to a patronage put pudding. he tried to get a restraining order from the federal judge. the judge wouldn't budge. ray kept showing up for work anyway. at one point, the lights went out and the phone lines went dead. some people interpreted this as a subtle message f
and buy the media? if you change california, blue, broken, broken, sacramento is broken. vote against every single tax, every single one. [applause] please vote against measures. >> i don't think the crowd needs to be reminded of that. [laughter] ann, the ballot is long. >> right. >> there's ten taxes there. vote against every single one. >> right. >> the last thing sacramento needs it more money. it's like giving heroin to a junky. >> i think you may need to go bankrupt. >> how do you buy media, but -- >> i'd also like to comment on your taking over the public schools and actually producing useful ones. liberals don't favor that, but liberals move heaven and earth to send their kids to private schools. that doesn't matter to them what happens in the public schools, and who is it fighting the vouchers tooth and nail. al gore was asked in a debate in harlem when he was running for president because he had been, you know, of course, the democrats that are beholding to the teachers' unions, and so a black gal reporter got up and said, now, you know, if you're big on the public schools, s
in california. that the particular time. there's a whole set of circumstance that lead her to, you know, she's from the tropics, central america, you know, how did she wind up in the desert. everybody has a story in the desert how they got there. she said, [inaudible] we'll take care of you and give you a place to live shortly there after. i arrive and one of the first things i saw when i rented my shack in the sand next to a sign that said next services 100 miles, the town of 129 presiden. i felt myself to go further out. they are at the edge of beautiful national park. you know that? right. if you haven't been there. u2 album. the joshua tree. you know what it looks like. crazy arms going this way and that. well, i wanted to go further out. there was something that was driving me further out in to the nothing. the big empty, as they say. and also because the further out you went the rent got cheaper and cheaper and cheaper. i was paying $27 5 a month for a two-bed rom house with five acres of land on the edge of 29 palms, right where the sign said next service 100 miles. that's where the b
won this election by a 50-48% margin. that may go up to around off 51-48 when california comes in california's last time to wipe weeks to count its votes. account with five cars in brazil but i'm not sure what california is so much less technologically advanced. but there we are. for all these figures are necessarily a little incomplete as they apply to the nation. there's some other states with votes still out, too. it appears that obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming he carries florida what he is in current counts ahead in the miami-dade county, people are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida commit electoral vote, 332-206. bush was a 51-40 margin in 2004 only got 286 votes. obama was slightly less it appeared, gets 332. i think there's a certain structural demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered in something large metropolitan areas, and in particular neighborhoods, an
generations. as governor he compete with other states for jobs and subsidies are relatively easy. california -- [laughter] anybody from california? california, illinois, connecticut, thank you. but those states are doing is raising taxes, raising regulations and so that's, you know, we are competing. but we do every day is to try and find companies out there that can't compete. i think about simply if you're a business come to think of yourself as a consumer. as a consumer, name the time did the research yourself, i think i'll pay more for the project because i know that company is headquartered in a high tax state. or gosh, i know they have more regulations saw pay more for the product because i know cost the company more for more regulations or takes longer to get a permit. you don't do it. so if we make sure that florida businesses have lower taxes, less regulation and faster permitting time, a pro-business attitude to our businesses will outcompete everybody and will get more jobs and that's what we're doing every day. in contrast, my biggest competitor is texas. texas has been doing the
was just in california last week and we need to compete across the country that involves investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. to talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, that is important. but we will not be competitive in the global marketplace we don't focus on it here at home. >> moderator: charlie summers? summers: our government has not been able to work together because of what everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax reform that makes sense. inefficiently accumulates revenue and is evenly distributed. what we need to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the misallocation of resources that we see to our government, as for instance in benghazi, when they drew down thousands of marine from iraq. we can have more independence there to make sure that the parties know that there is someone else available to take their place. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question right now. -- go ahead, really quickly -- okay. >> i have campaigned all over the state. some people ha
. i live in mississippi but i'm retired federal firefighter from california. and disasters, whether it's hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, whatever, most jurisdictions find that they're overwhelmed by the time it happens because disasters overwhelm every jurisdiction. so whether you're in new york or down in the coast of mississippi, the jurisdictions that are in charge of trying to mitigate these problems are so overwhelmed, and most are victims themselves. we need a national -- we need a national fire disaster program that exists within the federal government. the resources are there without going to a lot of expense. all disasters is similar to what would happen in a motel. a hotel, if everybody goes into a hotel, they see on the door what to do when a fire starts, how to get out, the hallways are designed to carry the capacity of the people, and so forth. and then once they're out they need to be accounted for. and he'd have an emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police a
town meetings and apples. we can of oranges in some other process in california to people can take the inspiration and use it from wherever they are to the democratic possibility rises up locally and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> here we go. >> and 73 from the historical society. if a sub for a librarian and were in the vault of history center in vermont. we've got a photo album created by george houghton, a vermonter who went down to view and take pictures of burbach troops are in civil war. he presented this album to us in 1863 after he returned from his third trip to virginia, taking pictures mostly of vermonters that camp, but also other scenes that he saw. one of the scenes that often reproduced as this one of a family of slaves again tieless. right below it is a photograph of soffa vermont officers. >> some of the other pictures showed been batteries they were using that were involved in this. there are photos here show in the aftermath at the burial ground of the soldiers. those photos get used a lot. there's a batter
won this election by a 50-48% margin. debts may go up to around it 50-48 when the folks in california command and last time it took five weeks to count their votes. they count them in five hours in brazil so i'm not sure why california's less technologically advanced but there we are. all these figures are incomplete as they replied -- it appears obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage and out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming that he carries florida where he is the current ahead in the miami-dade county. people are are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida his electoral vote victory is 332-206. bush was 51-48 margin in 2004 india 286 votes and obama was slightly less it appears against 332. i think there is a certain structure of demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered into large metropolitan areas and in particular neighborhoods and they give them a craft an initial advantage in the electoral college. president obama
of the regulars of electricity like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to energy providers, electricity providers to provide more efficiency to the ed vintage of the consumer by to reducing rates so there are many things we would be able to agree on and advance the cause of the carbonizing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move those numbers up even more so there is a classic example of how we did something. >> i wondered if the recommendations you are making i understand that you are trying to bring together all these agencies across the executive branch whether they are of the legislative branch is a very much partner in this. how do your recommendations bring the congressional leaders and to coordinate with them as well as the executive branch leadership? >> we will recommend that this would be institutionalized or created also legislativel
's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were put in military custody because we were all afraid and they looked like the enemy. that was not a high point in america. what are we talking about here? we're talking about detaining people under the law of war who are suspected of joining al qaeda of the taliban in engaging in a belligerent act against the united states. now, i want to make the record clear that some of my colleagues on the republican side have been trying to deny law of war detention to the obama administration, and they have openly said this. if you allow this to happen, president obama is going to put you in jail because of political dissent. there are people on my side who are afraid of law of war detention being in barack obama's hand because they think -- they hate him
and kirkpatrick democratic candidate and jonathan hunton, a republican event in california 26th district also the democratic when julie of the tony strickland, the republican, and then also michigan first dan, the republican in a four way race is the victor in michigan first district. those are some of the races that have been called. there are a few other out standing once. go to our website come c-span.org, and then also as i told you yesterday in the presidential race, in florida has yet to be called here is the absentee ballot voting delay to push right on the floor of the election. we don't know where the 29 electoral votes will go but have made every outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic here. what was your message to washington? a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal the cliff and that is what faces -- >> we will leave this portion of this morning's washington journal now to go live to the american enterprise institute for panel discussions on the election with fox news channel commentator michael barone, inside out columnist norman borkenstein and
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
of california, and the ninth circuit, and right out of boston here, fantastic work -- 1 a glad, gay lesbian advocates and defenders, they are bringing the most effective cases against the so-called defense of marriage act and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or all of those cases and then we will have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so it is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality so it felt appropriate to write about this comment and i will talk about who i intended it for. the book is layout, imagined a conversation between me and someone who would probably describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people although tolerances and called it is cracked up to being if you haven't noticed. i have a friend who says the only thing one should have to tolerate as hemorrhoids. perhaps a little overstated, but if you have ever been on the receiving end of tolerance, it doesn't feel all that much better than in tolerance. if someone is begrudgingly admitting your right to exist, it doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy, so i imagi
are not an outlet. we are a program at the university of california, a graduate program that does reporting, but we are working with different organizations. we do not really have an initiative, per said, but there are organizations that are doing incredible work with citizens. "the guardian" in the u.k. is the best example of a large organization that works with citizens on a huge scale. one of the things they did in the last couple years was pulled from public records about the way their politicians are spending money. millions of documents. they created a form and citizens volunteered to go through those millions of documents and competed. it was amazingly successful. i do not know how many thousands of people participated, but it was a lot. "the guardian" is very innovative. american journalists are trying to find ways to do this -- to engage citizens. we do not get a lot of cold calls or tips, but we never ignore. i do not know if there are journalists out there -- we never ignore a tip. i do not care how crazy it seems, how far-fetched -- we always follow up. you'll be surprised at how many a
, a little california adventure, to mar run county, california, after being in manhattan or brooklyn for 21, 22 years. >> host: why'd you move out there? >> guest: we wanted to try something different. our kids were at a nice age where they were out of diapers, but today didn't yet have girlfriends -- [laughter] and we have three boys. and we have this nice thing where we can kind of live anywhere because we have a lot of flexibility. i don't have to go into a office, my wife -- who used to work at mtv -- isn't working there now. and so -- >> host: may we ask who your wife is? >> guest: my wife is alexa robinson, she was a producer at mtv. she wasn't a vijay. >> host: okay. >> guest: and she -- and so we wanted to try and go on some kind of adventure with the kids to take advantage of the fact that we can live anywhere. and i've always loved northern california, and i have a lot of friends out there. because of all the technology projects that i've been involved with and things that i've written about, you know, it was helpful professionally to be out there for a while. so we've been off on
the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of things. as a rock drummer he was part of several groups one of which opened for steppenwolf among other performers for those old enough to remember that. his first film, rocking the wall about rock music had spared in bringing down communism started airing on pbs this weekend will continue throughout this year. he serves on the faculty at the university of dayton where he has talked business, economic history and military history, he is the author of a dozen books including first, a patriot's history of the united states which he co-authored. other topics on which he is written include national defence, history, the u.s. economy. a television series based on winklevoss is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome juan williams to hear about his newest book, winklevoss which in this case will be from 1898 -- winklevoss -- a patriot's history of the modern world. >> thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it is an
-- [laughter] california -- anybody from california? illinois, connecticut -- thank goodness. [laughter] what those states are doing is raising taxes, raising regulation, and so that's -- that's our, you know, we're competing and so what we do every day is find companies out there who can't compete. i think about it as this. if you're in business or think about yourself as a consumer. as a consumer, name a time you said to yourself, you know, i'll pay more for that product because they are headquartered in the high tax state. [laughter] oh, gosh, they have more regulations, i'll pay more for that because it costs the company more because they have regulations or it takes longer to get a permit. you don't do it. if we make sure that florida businesses have lower taxes, less regulations, faster permitting time, a pro-business attitude, our businesses will out compete everybody. we'll get more competitive every day. our biggest competitor is texas. texas is doing the right thing. look at the last of the eight years, texas is the number one place to do business. when i first got legislated, i --
, um, in california we haven't adopted charter schools and vouchers and choice as much as you have experienced in washington d.c. my belief is that when we introduce choice, um, the public schools will rise, the bar will rise for the public schools because then they have to keep up with the charter schools and the voucher schools that parents elect to go to. is that a belief that you experienced in washington, d.c.? what happened to the public schools and how they performed when that 42% that you mentioned earlier came into place? >> yeah, it absolutely makes a difference. i don't think that you can have reform in education without choice, and frankly, without choice there won't be an incentive for the bureaucracy to change. i mean, look, it's easy for people to fall into the category of, you know, you're bashing teachers. they say if you want change, you push the change, you're not supporting public schools. i support public schools. when i was in office, i gave the teachers the largest raise they ever got. i gave the schools more money than they asked for, and over the period of
proud that in california, our delegation of democrats is a majority of women, not even counting our two senators, senator feinstein and senator boxer. so women are empowered in california. i also want to acknowledge that although our number are great, two of our colleagues have gone on to the senate. senator baldwin -- [applause] >> we are very proud of that. senator-elect -- [applause] only the second woman of color to serve in the senate. so that's pretty exciting. and, unfortunately, we won't have capital coal -- kathy local and betty sutton in this next congress, but the future is soon and coming upon us and we know they will be making a great public contribution. so here we are. in the past week since the election were still finishing up some of our campaigns. we are very proud of the success or as i said yesterday, and as you see here today. why is it important for us to make this statement of the strength of women in the congress of the united states, of the house democratic women? because this is where hopes and dreams of america's families are rising. they may not know that. th
was at active in the civil rights movement in the 60s and in the 70s he was in northwest california where he and his wife raised their two sons neck and neil. he taught at a conference of one high school among the redwoods. and he began writing about contemporary issues. he is a prolific writer. his latest book is "mr. president: how and why the founders created a chief executive." it is my pleasure to welcome back to the david library, ray raphael. [applause] >> it is a pleasure to be at the david library with a full and eager crowd. this history is important. we will be talking not about ancient history by contemporary history. the history of the founding and let me start by noting that americans engage every four years into very unique principles. one in october and we are about to start six days from now. about half the nation firmly determined that their side loses nomination goes to ruins. they figure out which of the two contestants they prefer. that is one of our rituals. it is highly partisan. the other ritual that we will also talk about his every four years in october, americans u
next to the chevy plant in van nuys, california, and we were the loser kids, poor kids who we were supposed to go to vietnam, and if we department get kill, go work in the chevy plant. it was a uaw job, made refrigerators. my father sold them, and they took away the chevy plant, loaded it up on the railroad tracks, took it down to mexico. like they took the plant to china now. they took away our lives. they took away our jobs. i'm not going to let them take away our votes too. i thank you for giving me this opportunity to help us all steal back our votes. thank you very much. [applause] >>> for more information, visit the author's webs, gregpalst.com. >> conservative scholar presents thoughts on the obama presidency and what he deems are the, quote, "fatal contradictions, end quote, of liberalism. he speaks to the audience and answers questions for about an hour. >> good evening. i'm matthew spalding, vice president of american studies here at the american foundation. we're in for a treat. here we are, approaching election, pretends ton a water shed recognized by both political par
to happen. nancy pelosi is in california. her home, in name pa valley -- napa valley, was broken into on monday. so she actually has some literal housekeeping to take care of. they don't know what is missing and sort of this bizarre thing. now, in the event that she does retire or resign from congress, steny hoyer would be the front runner to take over as minority leader. the sort of subtext, it's almost a shakespearian subtext between hoyer and pelosi. they interned together on capitol hill in the 1960s, and they've been rivals for years, most poignantly in the last 10, 12 years as they competed for leadership positions in the democratic caucus. hoyer would very much like to be minority leader, and he would make a bid. the question now is whether pelosi is maneuvering, is trying to line up somebody who would be her successor of chose. so there's a lot of drama. >> and just rattle off, if you would, who is in that next generation of would-be party leaders who would like to have pelosi's endorsement, or even if they don't, would like to move up? >> the -- right now outside of hoye
think people were shocked by the right in california. tell us about that and how does it change the movement or the way that people perceive civil rights. what does it do to the black community, what does it do to white liberalism? what happens? >> to the white liberalism what it does is a number of liberals were shoulder to shoulder with blacks in the south, some of them got killed and lots of them sat back and said these guys are not like the nonviolent civil rights people, they are hoodlums. they are bad people fighting police bringing down buildings, and so this sort of makes a lot of white people cautious. they are not really sure what is happening here and they don't like what they see. i'm not saying it to give up on freedom struggles. johnson doesn't give up on the freedom struggle. he continues to try to get legislation after this although initially staggered how could this happen. he's done more than any president by far that happens under his watch and he was just really shaken by this but he got over it. a lot of others were uncertain. but even johnson realized he ha
. on marriage they were decisive to pass proposition 8 in california, 50% voted for proposition 8 in california. we are extremely conservative and we also have to understand that there's a big difference between the old latino community of some 20 or 30 years ago what i call the cesar chavez latino community, the puerto ricans in new york and chicago and those in the southwest since the u.s. basically took half of mexico and the new population which is 40% foreign-born and the rest of the children of immigrants come a very conservative i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary that we get caught up in the polls we've seen it in this election cycle and besides pulling them with specific issues if we had a better understanding of what they are coming from you would get an understanding of why they are answering the question, but i believe with the latino community we lost the vote because of immigration. if we would have had a better position on immigration from the get go come from the primary government romney would have been competitive in those battle
were shocked by the riot in california, the riot nla. tell us about that. how does it really change the black movement or just the way people perceive civil rights. i guess another way of putting it is what does it do to the black community? what does it do to equate liberalism? >> guest: to white liberalism, but it does is other white liberals were shoulder to shoulder with blacks in the south. some of them got killed. after a while, a lot of them sat back and said these guys are not christlike, nonviolent civil rights people. they are hoodlums. they are burn baby burn. they are bad people fighting police. in the burn down buildings. so, this sort of makes a lot of white people cautious and they're not really sure what is happening here and they don't like what they see. i am not saying that they give up on freedom struggle. johnson doesn't give up on the freedom struggle. he continues to get legislation and initially stack. like how could this happen. he done within a president by fire for civil rights and it happened under his watch. he was just really shaken by this, but he got
. >> host: >> guest: he is a term senator from new york. the biggest powerful state like california at the day and he's the founding father of the republican party this is the second election they've ever participated in. he is the dominant figure in the republican party. it's a sort of he is more significant than any other figures in the party combined. another alternative is the man that is responsible for the republican party in ohio and much of the with midwest and the big states. perhaps one of america's most famous antislavery advocates famous as a radical abolitionist he didn't start out that way but at this point he was. they are not radical he was generally perceived to be that way because of the speeches that were viewed to read because lincoln didn't have a record he could convince them they were portraying themselves as the least radical who then owned up to the rights so they go in and sewer doesn't just have the it feige of being the dominant republican and the governor from new york. he also [inaudible] >> it's marvelous. it perfectly portrays the inaki valley in natu
to guess? [laughter] california. who would have thought? >> i would have thought new york. >> yeah, exactly. >> because of you. >> no. [laughter] of course, because of subways, but this is nontransportation. why? california's per capita -- 40% of our energy consumption is heating and cooling buildings where they be residential, commercial or factory. 35% is transportation. and california in 1978 passed building standards under then-governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons bury as governor moon beam. but he got it passed, so every new building in california had to meet energy efficiency standards. it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things, and as i said, portman and shaheen have been working on a compromise on this. these are the kinds of things we can do to make ourselves energy independent. my view, look, katrina -- sorry, sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or the ore. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry, we ha
's called california. it's called maryland coming and i don't see any reason why we don't wait two years to see whether how california is doing with their new higher marginal tax rates on folks and sales taxes on middle-income people as well and sales taxes and maryland raising the tax on guys that made a million come to madrid 50, and they are down to under 50 tax in maryland because they can't leave. they make a million dollars and they can walk across the border. so, we are seeing some very -- people are testing obama's peery in the state and i think we should do it on a small state like vermont at first and see how it works. whereas texas and florida are giving an idea of how you can govern without an income tax. people moved. we kind of know what is going to happen here. indiana, illinois, big border. they just past the right to work and they're giving the school kids a choice of a falter scholarship. illinois raised taxes want to inform the government worker pension system. who is going to build a factory in the 100 miles on the western side of the border? any takers for the people
south and west as california. those screws that can get in relatively fast have driven in. we still have equipment in teams on the west coast that the concern was still three to five days transit time to get them to the east coast. there's also concern that if they couldn't get back to their fire season when think it's going they would send the resources. so the president directed that we bring to bear dat resources aircraft. so there are teams and equipment that will be airlifted from california, west coast teams to support this response, but also understand that teams for our do nothing well before sandi hit. additional teams called from the midwest and the south, where it makes sense they can drive and faster. whether it makes sense to fly teams in come of the crew starts flying this afternoon. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> next question from an adrenaline. >> hi, i'm wondering how the contracting process is going. i know some contracts are rhodium placed. this request for proposals for other types of aid. and also, this fema have enough money with a 3.6 billion, especially when the
was just in california and we need to compete across the country that involves investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, we don't focus on being more competitive or more grants. >> moderator: cohead 3 >> moderator: cohead >> it is due to the fact that our government hasn't been able to work together like everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things. it is equitably distributed. when i want to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reforms. and the evidence of benghazi. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question. >> i have campaigned with people all over the state. i think the best thing we can do is get government off of businesses back so that they understand that if they have a tax system that is fair and they can plan five or 10 years down the road in terms of buying equipment and hiring people, the best thing that they can do is get government out of the way to reduce relations and cut spending so that the economy can grow and people can have jobs to feed their families. >> moderator: over the p
. i think a lot of it has to do with -- i think people were more shocked by the riot in california. the riot in l.a. tell us about that. how does it really change the black movement? or just the way people perceive civil rights? i guess another way of putting it. what does it do to black community, to white liberalism. what happens with watts? >> guest: to white liberalism, what it does is -- a number of white liberals were shoulder-to-shoulder with blacks in the south, some were killed. after watts a lot of them sat back and said, hmm, these guys, they're not christ like nonviolent civil rights people. they're hoodlums. they're burning -- burn, baby, burn, they're bad people, fighting the police, and burning down buildings. and so this sort of makes a lot of white people cautious and not really sure what is happening here. and they don't like what they see. i'm not a saying that they give up on freedom struggle. johnson doesn't give up on in the freedom struggle. he continues to try to get legislation after this. although initially he is staggered by this how much could this happe
to life. on marriage, latinos were decisive to pass proposition eight in california, 53% of latinos voted for proposition eight in california. we are extremely conservative. i think, and we also have to understand there's some difference between the old latino community of say 20, 30 years ago what i call the cesar chavez a team community, and, the new york, the puerto ricans in new york and chicago, and those in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we
are not an outlet. we are program at the university of california berkeley as a graduate program that does reporting, but working with different organizations. we don't have an initiative per se. there are organizations that are doing incredible work with citizens. the guardian u.k. is the best example of a large news organization that works with citizens on huge scale. one thing they did in the last couple years was to pull public records about the way their politicians were spending money. they created kind of a forum. citizens volunteered to go through millions of documents and they competed, it was amazingly successful. don't know how many people participated but it was a lot. the guardian is very innovative and probably less squeamish at trying to find ways to engage citizens. i will save for us we don't get a lot of tips, but we never -- don't know of journalists are experienced but never ignore. i don't know how crazy it seems, how nonsensical it seems, how far fetched about aliens, we follow up on every single tip and you will be surprised how many stories actually we get out of those tips,
is this. not the hardware, but the software, the retail, the google. last book i was in california's silicon valley, working and talking to tech companies. we need to start k through 12 and we need to revamp maine's economy. we have a small economic engine, huge infrastructure. we can compete but we need to be closer to this, and while shoes were great for the economy and maine has great shoe companies, we need to be closer to this for the future. >> moderator: thank you. danny dalton. dalton: our educational problem has been advanced since i was this tall. we have the same problems in education, tax reform can health care, everything is the same. nothing's changed. this whole idea that our congress, all of a sudden can't get along and address these problems is fiction, because what's been going on is that implicitly our represent-to-two parties have basically a monopoly over the country that are controlled by lobbiests. aren't addressing these problems, it's been decades and same problem. higher education is a joke because it's a big business. we have an implied guarantee by the
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